Tips before the trip

Kids Track – security screening entrance for families with children

Families with children have their own entrance to the security checkpoint in Terminal 5, for Gates F26-F69. This makes going through screening faster and smoother for you and your children.

Baby food

You can have jars of baby food, squeeze pouches and formula that you need during the flight in your hand baggage. You need to have the baby food separate from your hand baggage so that it can be screened in security. 

Loan of prams

The majority of airlines request that prams are checked in. If you need a pram after checking in, there are prams that can be loaned in terminals 2, 4 and 5. If you are travelling from Terminal 3, you can pick one up in Terminal 2.

Stroller bags

Stroller bags is aviable at check-in.

Playgrounds

At Stockholm Arlanda Airport there are two playgrounds: one in Terminal 4 and one in Terminal 5. Both have been designed together with Junibacken.

Baby changing room

Baby changing rooms are located in all terminals, in both the men’s and women’s toilets.

Unaccompanied children

Sometimes children need to travel on their own. To make this possible, there is an assistance service for children travelling on their own. This entails trained staff taking care of the child for the entire journey.
 
Be sure to book your child’s flight well in advance since the number of children flying unaccompanied per flight is limited. Specify when you book that you would like assistance service for an unaccompanied child. Flights within Scandinavia are usually booked on-line and you can book other flights by phone.  

Most airlines charge a service fee for unaccompanied children. Check with the airline to see what it costs for a child flying unaccompanied.

Please note that unaccompanied children cannot board the aircraft if there is a risk that the weather will be so bad that it may be difficult to land at the destination. For other situations, for instance, if there is a delay, we provide your child with information and assistance and make sure that parents receive detailed information about all changes. Your child is never left unattended.  

Children ages 5–11 

Children between the ages of 5 and 11 may not travel unaccompanied, but must be assisted by an airport attendant. If the child is between 5 and 11 and travelling with someone who is at least 16, assistance service is not necessary. 

Children ages 12–16 

Children between the ages of 12 and 16 may travel unaccompanied but are entitled to assistance if necessary. Assistance service is thus optional, but most airlines require approval from the caregiver if a child under 16 is travelling unaccompanied. Check with the airline to see what rules apply to your child’s trip.

Assistance services, step by step

Here is a general description of what happens when a child travels unaccompanied with assistance service.

  1. You will receive a so-called handling document in which you enter personal data about your child, his or her itinerary and the name of the person who will meet the child on arrival and which is signed by the caregiver.
  2. At the airport, you help your child check in and drop off baggage. As caregiver, you must present a valid form of identification at check-in, regardless of where your child is travelling. You must remain at the airport until your child’s plane has taken off.
  3. EU regulations stipulate that only those who are travelling and have a boarding card may pass through the security checkpoint and enter the transit area. If your child is flying domestically to another destination in Sweden, you can disregard these regulations and accompany your child all the way to the gate. Contact staff at the airport so they can assist you.
  4. Your child will be assisted by staff through the security checkpoint, up to the gate and on board the aircraft.
  5. On board, the cabin crew help your child find the right seat, keep an eye on him/her throughout the flight and help the child off the plane on arrival.
  6. On arrival, staff meet your child at the aircraft, take care of any baggage and accompany him/her through customs and passport control. After this, the child is handed over to the person assigned to meet the child (the adult named in the handling document). To make sure this is the right person, we need to see a valid form of identification from the person meeting the child.  

Inform the airline at the time of booking that you will be bringing an animal on board – the number of animals permitted on board is often limited. Remember that airlines usually charge an extra fee for allowing an animal to travel inside the aircraft.

Larger animals can sometimes be transported as air cargo in compliance with special regulations. Contact your airline to find out what rules and charges apply.

Special needs and concerns when you fly

You’ll find important information here for people who have special needs or concerns when they fly – for instance, if you have a functional impairment and require assistance, if you have an allergy or are afraid of flying.

We at Swedavia want everyone to be able to fly. Therefore you can get extra assistance at the airport – so you’ll be able to feel as safe and secure as possible. You can read more here about how passenger assistance works and how you book, pack medicines, check in mobility aids or travel with an assistance dog. You can also read about how it works if your child is travelling on his or her own and get tips if you are afraid of flying. There is also information for you if you have impaired vision or hearing and want to know more about how things work at airports and on board the aircraft.

Please let us know if you have special needs when you book your flight and try to describe what you need assistance with. It is a good idea to book passenger assistance 48 hours before your departure through your airline. The earlier you let us know, the better prepared staff are to assist you – both at the airport and on board the aircraft.  

Reduced mobility

You can read more here about reduced mobility on board the aircraft and what rules apply to wheelchairs and walkers in conjunction with the flight. Keep in mind that airline rules vary depending on whether your wheelchair is manual or electric.

On board the aircraft, the airline is responsible for you as a passenger, and every airline has special rules for each aircraft type. Usually, the larger the aircraft, the better access there is for people with reduced mobility. Small aircraft also have very limited cargo space, so it is difficult to get space for wheelchairs, especially electric wheelchairs.

Do you have a functional impairment that entails reduced mobility and means that you need assistance at meal times and to use the lavatory? Then most airlines want you to travel accompanied by a personal assistant who can help you during your journey. Read more about this below.

If you use a wheelchair, it is a good idea to choose a bag for your hand baggage that fits in your lap since a personal assistant or the assisting airport attendant may have difficulty carrying your hand baggage and pushing the wheelchair at the same time.

If you have a walker, you should show it when you check in so that it gets a baggage tag, you can then use the walker at the airport all the way to the gate. Staff will then take care of the walker and place it in the baggage hold.

Impaired hearing
You can find information here that may make it easier for people with impaired hearing, so you can feel safe and secure before, during and after your flight.

Is your hearing impaired so that you need assistance during your journey? Then it’s important that you mention this to staff – both when you book your flight and when you board the aircraft. If you want, you can also book assistance ahead of time. Read more about this under the heading “Assistance service”.

At the airport, you will get information about when the plane departs or lands on information boards and monitors. There are also signs that lead you to the right gate. All of Swedavia’s airports also have assistive listening technology (hearing loop system) available at their information desks. 

Cabin crew can personally provide information to you, for instance, about safety on board. There is also an information sheet in each seat pocket with a detailed description of procedures in case of an emergency. 

Impaired vision
You can find information here that may make it easier for people with impaired vision so that you can feel safe and secure before, during and after your flight.

Is your vision impaired so that you need assistance during your journey? Then it’s important that you mention this to staff – both when you book your flight and when you board the aircraft. If you want, you can also book assistance ahead of time. Read more about this under the heading “Assistance service”.

At the airport you will get some information about the flight through announcements on the loudspeaker system. But unfortunately, some airports limit the announcements they make on the loudspeaker system and instead refer passengers to information boards and monitors. Most airports have an information desk with staff that can personally provide you with information, for instance, about your flight.

At some airports, there are also tactile floor markings that lead to a help point or information desk. 
Cabin crew can personally provide you with information, for instance, about safety on board. 

Assistance service
Assistance entails providing an airport attendant to assist passengers with a functional impairment at the airport and all the way to their seat on the plane if that is desired. Be sure to mention your needs when you book so that you can get the best assistance possible. Also remember to contact us when you have arrived at the airport so that we know you are here and are waiting for an airport attendant.

For instance, you can get an airport attendant to assist you if you have a functional impairment that entails reduced mobility, impaired vision or impaired hearing, or if you feel anxious and have difficulty finding your way in new places. Assistance service is free of charge for people with a functional impairment. People are also legally entitled to the assistance of an airport attendant so that everyone has the possibility to fly. If you do not have a functional impairment but still want an airport attendant, you pay a fee to the airline.

Assistance dog
If you are travelling with an assistance dog, you can find useful information here that may be good to keep in mind before your trip. Assistance dogs certified to be on board the aircraft are guide dogs, service dogs and hearing dogs as well as alert dogs for epilepsy, diabetes and migraines.

If you are travelling with an assistance dog, it is important that you mention this to the airline when you book your flight. You will also need to:

  • ask the airline what rules apply for assistance dogs on the flight you are taking.
  • check what rules apply for assistance dogs in the country you are flying to.
  • check what vaccinations the dog must have and whether there are any quarantine rules for the country you are flying to. 

An assistance dog is usually permitted to travel with you in the aircraft. The dog is not included in the weight allowance for regular baggage and does not need to sit in a cage in the aircraft. There is no additional charge for an assistance dog. 

Even if you have a guide dog, you can get assistance at the airport and assistance to get to your seat if you want. Read more about this under the heading “Assistance service”.

Allergies
It can be difficult to completely avoid things that cause an allergic reaction at an airport. For instance, the scents from perfume shops in the terminal can spread beyond the shop. At airports abroad, smoking in cafés and restaurants can entail problems for people with allergies. The same applies for animals with fur and the fragrances people wear. You can get assistance from an airport attendant that can be adapted so that you avoid passing perfume shops as much as possible.

Allergies and special diets on board the aircraft

Are you allergic or hypersensitive to some food or beverage, do you have diabetes, or do you have other dietary requirements? Mention this when you book your flight. Often the airline can give you different food or a different beverage, but in some cases that could mean you pay a fee. Some airlines can see to it that no animals with fur are on the flight you take. 

Read more about what allergy-related procedures there are on your airline’s website.

Peanut allergy

Some airlines still serve peanuts. So if you are allergic to peanuts, you need to tell people – both the airline when you book and the cabin crew when you board the aircraft. You also need to describe in writing your peanut allergy and the consequences if you are exposed to peanuts. It is a good idea to write this in both Swedish and English and leave this note with the cabin crew. Ask them to also give this information to the captain.